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Published January 1988

Plot: Joe is sent to Colorado to warn a witness that a hitman is out to get him.  On the way Joe gets ambushed and losses his memory, and he thinks that his brother Frank is the hitman!

Review:  I'm still reading this one (up to Chapter 5), but I've read the book in the past.

But, you know its interesting, in this recent re-read of the Casefiles series, I'm seeing what made this series the most popular spin-off of the original series.  The first 10 books have been very consistent in staying with the style of the original series, but building onto a style that is reminiscent of the James Bond/Indiana Jones movies.  But at the same time, the books don't keep bringing back the Network or the Assassins in every single book (unlike The Undercover Brothers ATAC, or the Hardy's "deal" in the Adventures and their police troubles).  Just to refresh:

#1 Dead on Target - Network and Assassions (pilot book, sets tone of the series)
#2 Evil, Inc. - Network does appear at the beginning, but then it is the Hardy's by themselves for the rest of the book.
#3 Cult Of Crime - mostly a Frank book, with Joe helping out, and the Network only makes a brief radio appearance (case came from Fenton Hardy)
#4 The Lazarus Plot - a Network/Assassin story, dealing with both brothers
#5 Edge Of Destruction - no Network or Assassin, except in passing mention about the Hardy's experience, otherwise the story is a Hardy's story stand-alone case.
#6 The Crowning Terror - again, a Hardy stand-alone caper, although it does introduce Espionage Resources and the enmity that ER has for the Network
#7 Deathgame - no appearance of the Network, as the book is a Joe story, with Frank helping out
#8 See No Evil - no Network appearance, but for a major switch, it is a Callie Shaw story, with Frank and Joe in supporting roles
#9 The Genius Thieves - again no Network appearance, with Frank taking the majority of the book, while Joe is just in a supporting role (case came from Fenton Hardy)
#10 Hostages of Hate - after 5 books with no peep, except for passing references to the events of Dead On Target, the Network makes a small appearance, however, Espionage Resources also makes a larger apperance, but again its mostly the Hardy's flying solo.

And now with Brother Against Brother, there is a dream sequence to start off the book that references Hostages Of Hate, and a few other dream sequences that reference the earlier books, so the Assassins do make a brief appearnce, but its only in a dream.  Otherwise its a stand-alone story, with Frank and Joe getting a case from Fenton (like they got their cases in Cult Of Crime & The Genius Thieves).  So the first 11 books were offering a variety of stories and cases that helped to define the series from its predecessor, but at the same time also kept some of case styles and ways that the Hardy's stumbled on a case in the original series, in the Casefiles.  But the books were also written in a style that retained the techno-mystery adult novels that were out at the time (like the James Bond novels, Tom Clancy or the Star Trek novels).
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Hardy Boys Adventures / Re: Hardy Boys Adventures #16- Stolen Identity
« Last post by tomswift2002 on February 16, 2018, 02:59:11 PM »
I just finished the book.  5.5/10.  It was good, however the author kept throwing in references to other cases that the boys had solved but we the reader had not read (kind of like “Dead of Night”, but in that case you knew what the author was referring to).  And the crooks were connected to some of these old cases, but without much more background, they really came across as two random bad guys. 

I’m still confused as to what the title was referring to.  No one’s identity was stolen, and the one closest thing turned out to be a fictional, made-up identity.

The action was good, but the plot needed more work.
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Hardy Boys Adventures / Re: Hardy Boys Adventures #16- Stolen Identity
« Last post by tomswift2002 on February 16, 2018, 01:36:12 PM »
I think all the books have previews. 

I’ve started the book.  It’s decent so far, however I’ve got no idea what the title has to do with the story.  So far the boys are not liked by the acting Bayport Police Chief, Lt. Wolfe, and are having pages of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s manuscript for “A Scandal In Bohemia” showing up in their things.
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Hardy Boys Adventures / Re: Hardy Boys Adventures #16- Stolen Identity
« Last post by Bigfootman on February 16, 2018, 12:02:17 PM »
And looking at the table of contents it looks like Chapter 16 is only 3 pages long, with a few others only being 4 pages.
I suspect that $&$ added the preview to pad out the books length. Did any other adventures books have previews?
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Hardy Boys Adventures / Re: Hardy Boys Adventures #16- Stolen Identity
« Last post by tomswift2002 on February 16, 2018, 11:58:20 AM »
I'm pretty sure that's the ghostwriters fault. All of Michael Anthony Steele's adventures books have been ridiculously short. Even by adventures standards.

And looking at the table of contents it looks like Chapter 16 is only 3 pages long, with a few others only being 4 pages.
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Hardy Boys Adventures / Re: Hardy Boys Adventures #16- Stolen Identity
« Last post by Bigfootman on February 16, 2018, 11:30:59 AM »
I just got the book.  It’s page count is a whopping 117 pages, plus 20 pages from “The Grey Hunter’s Revenge” as a sneak-peak (so 137 altogether).
I'm pretty sure that's the ghostwriters fault. All of Michael Anthony Steele's adventures books have been ridiculously short. Even by adventures standards.
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Hardy Boys Adventures / Re: Hardy Boys Adventures #16- Stolen Identity
« Last post by tomswift2002 on February 16, 2018, 11:14:52 AM »
And it’s got 21 chapters over those 117 pages.  Last time I saw 21 chapters in a stand-alone Hardy Boys book was in the original text of “The Secret Of Pirates’ Hill”, but that book had 25 chapters over about 220 pages.
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Hardy Boys Adventures / Re: Hardy Boys Adventures #16- Stolen Identity
« Last post by tomswift2002 on February 16, 2018, 11:07:34 AM »
I just got the book.  It’s page count is a whopping 117 pages, plus 20 pages from “The Grey Hunter’s Revenge” as a sneak-peak (so 137 altogether).
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! That's quite something, I have a Wanderer "Sinister Omen", I'll have to take a look at it.  I'm not a big Nancy Drew reader, but "Sinister Omen" is the only one were I remember her flying an airplane.  I read "Captive Witness" about 15 years ago, but don't remember much about it except for something about the Iron curtain.
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I was reading the blog "Series Book for Girls" when I found this article:
https://series-books.blogspot.ca/2016/05/comparing-nancy-drew-and-hardy-boys.html
I'd highly recommend reading the whole thing, but I'll quote the relevant part here.
"I believe that the Stratemeyer Syndicate had to scramble to try to keep up with the Nancy Drew series after Harriet's death.  Some Nancy Drew Wanderer books were apparently rewritten from what would have been Hardy Boys books.  Nancy Drew #64 Captive Witness reads like a Hardy Boys book, and Nancy actually acts like a boy and not like herself.

Nancy Drew #67 The Sinister Omen also reads like a Hardy Boys book, and Nancy even rescues her father from imprisonment just like the Hardys would have done with Fenton. Not only that, but in the first Wanderer printing of The Sinister Omen, Carson is actually called "Fenton" on page 79 and "Mr. Hardy" on page 84.  Last, Nancy Drew #75 The Emerald-Eyed Cat Mystery mentions Bayport!  It looks like three Hardy Boys books were changed into Nancy Drew books during the Wanderer era!"

I  have the first printing of the Sinister Omen, and here are the quotes mentioned:
Page 79: "I found out that you were relocated, Fenton,"
Page 84: "The losses now are running towards the billion-dollar mark," Mr. Hardy said,"

I should also note that Captive Witness and The Sinister Omen both had the same ghostwriter, Richard Ballad.
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